Journals Log In | Journals Account Info

Books Cart  
Journals Cart  
 
 
SEARCH
  
Browse Books

Nebraska 150 Sale
New March Books
Passover Sale
Women's History Month Sale
March Madness Sale


ie logo
UNP e-Newsletter
(PDF version)

 


Facebook page  Twitter  Pinterest  Instagram
Connect with Us

Spring/Summer 2017 catalog

Spring/Summer 2017 Catalog
(Download PDF)

 

Fall/Winter 2016 catalog

Fall/Winter 2016 e-catalog
Download PDF

Potomac Books

JPS

 
NEW IN MARCH

Save 30% off new March books! Enter 6WMAR7 in the campaign code field of your shopping cart and click "Add Campaign Code." Offer expires March 31, 2017 and is good on U.S. and Canadian shipments only.

There I Go Again There I Go Again
How I Came to Be Mr. Feeny, John Adams, Dr. Craig, KITT, and Many Others
William Daniels

There I Go Again is a celebrity memoir like no other, revealing the life of a man whose acting career has been so rich that millions of Americans know his face even while they might not recognize his name.

Beautifully Grotesque Fish of the American West Beautifully Grotesque Fish of the American West
Mark Spitzer

Fisherman Mark Spitzer takes readers on an action-packed investigation of the most fierce and fearsome freshwater grotesques of the American West ever to inspire both hatred and fascination. Through the lenses of history, folklore, biology, ecology, and politics, Beautifully Grotesque Fish of the American West depicts the environmental destruction plaguing the most maligned creatures in our midst while subtly interweaving Spitzer’s experiences of personal tragedy and self-discovery.

Macho Row Macho Row
The 1993 Phillies and Baseball’s Unwritten Code William C. Kashatus

Colorful, shaggy, and unkempt, misfits and outlaws, the 1993 Phillies played hard and partied hard. Led by Darren Daulton, John Kruk, Lenny Dykstra, and Mitch Williams, it was a team the fans loved and continue to love today. Focusing on six key members of the team, Macho Row follows the remarkable season with an up-close look at the players’ lives, the team’s triumphs and failures, and what made this group so unique and so successful.

Baseball Beyond Our Borders Baseball Beyond Our Borders
An International Pastime
Edited and with an introduction by George Gmelch and Daniel A. Nathan

Baseball Beyond Our Borders celebrates the globalization of the game while highlighting the different histories and cultures of the nations in which the sport is played.

American Journalists in the Great War American Journalists in the Great War
Rewriting the Rules of Reporting
Chris Dubbs

When war erupted in Europe in 1914, American journalists hurried across the Atlantic ready to cover it the same way they had covered so many other wars. However, very little about this war was like any other. Its scale, brutality, and duration forced journalists to write their own rules for reporting and keeping the American public informed.

Pain Woman Takes Your Keys, and Other Essays from a Nervous System Pain Woman Takes Your Keys, and Other Essays from a Nervous System
Sonya Huber

Rate your pain on a scale of one to ten. What about on a scale of spicy to citrus? Is it more like a lava lamp or a mosaic? Pain, though a universal element of human experience, is dimly understood and sometimes barely managed. Pain Woman Takes Your Keys, and Other Essays from a Nervous System is a collection of literary and experimental essays about living with chronic pain.

The Woods Are On Fire The Woods Are On Fire
New and Selected Poems
Fleda Brown
Introduction by Ted Kooser

The Woods Are On Fire includes nearly fifty new poems, along with poems selected from seven previous books, showcasing an influential American poet’s work over the last few decades.

After the Ceremonies After the Ceremonies
New and Selected Poems
Ama Ata Aidoo
Edited and with a foreword by Helen Yitah

Ama Ata Aidoo is one of the best-known African writers today. Spanning three decades of work, the poems in this collection address themes of colonialism, independence, motherhood, and gender in intimate, personal ways alongside commentary on broader social issues.

The January Children The January Children
Safia Elhillo
Foreword by Kwame Dawes

In her dedication Safia Elhillo writes, “The January Children are the generation born in Sudan under British occupation, where children were assigned birth years by height, all given the birth date January 1.” What follows is a deeply personal collection of poems that describe the experience of navigating the postcolonial world as a stranger in one’s own land.

Beating the Graves Beating the Graves
Tsitsi Ella Jaji

The poems in Tsitsi Ella Jaji’s Beating the Graves meditate on the meaning of living in diaspora, an experience increasingly common among contemporary Zimbabweans.

Justice for All Justice for All
How the Jewish Bible Revolutionized Ethics
Jeremiah Unterman

Justice for All demonstrates that the Jewish Bible, by radically changing the course of ethical thought, came to exercise enormous influence on Jewish thought and law and also laid the basis for Christian ethics and the broader development of modern Western civilization.

The Other Exchange The Other Exchange
Women, Servants, and the Urban Underclass in Early Modern English Literature
Denys Van Renen

Prompted by commercial and imperial expansion such as the creation of the Bank of England in 1694 and the publication and circulation of Ben Jonson’s The Staple of News in 1626, rapidly changing cultural, economic, and political realities in early modern England generated a paradigmatic shift in class awareness. Denys Van Renen’s The Other Exchange demonstrates how middle-class consciousness not only emerged in opposition to the lived and perceived abuses of the aristocratic elite but also was fostered by the economic and sociocultural influence of women and lower-class urban communities.

Words Like Daggers Words Like Daggers
Violent Female Speech in Early Modern England
Kirilka Stavreva

Dramatic and documentary narratives about aggressive and garrulous women often cast such women as reckless and ultimately unsuccessful usurpers of cultural authority. Contending narratives, however, sometimes within the same texts, point to the effective subversion and undoing of the normative restrictions of social and gender hierarchies. Words Like Daggers explores the scolding invectives, malevolent curses, and ecstatic prophesies of early modern women as attested to in legal documents, letters, self-narratives, popular pamphlets, ballads, and dramas of the era.