Journals Log In | Journals Account Info

Books Cart  
Journals Cart  
 
 
SEARCH
  
Browse Books

New December Books


ie logo
UNP e-Newsletter
(PDF version)

Holiday Hours
Gift Book Ideas
World War I Books
John G. Neihardt Library
Recent Award Winners

Facebook page  Twitter  Pinterest

Connect with Us

American Indian & Indigenous Studies

American Indian &
Indigenous Studies e-catalog

Download PDF

History

History e-catalog
Download PDF

Spring/Summer 2015 catalog

Spring/Summer 2015 e-catalog
Download PDF

Potomac Books

JPS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nadirs, Nadirs, 0803231970, 0-8032-3197-0, 978-0-8032-3197-9, 9780803231979, Herta Muller Translated and with an afterword by Sieglinde Lug, European Women Writers, Nadirs, 0803282540, 0-8032-8254-0, 978-0-8032-8254-4, 9780803282544, Herta Muller Translated and with an afterword by Sieglinde Lug, European Women Writers, Nadirs, 0803235836, 0-8032-3583-6, 978-0-8032-3583-0, 9780803235830, Herta Muller Translated and with an afterword by Sieglinde Lug, European Women Writer

Nadirs
Herta Müller
Translated and with an afterword by Sieglinde Lug

hardcover
1999. 126 pp.
978-0-8032-3197-9
$24.95 t
Out of Stock
 
paperback
1999. 126 pp.
978-0-8032-8254-4
$16.95 t
 

Juxtaposing reality and fantasy, nightmares and dark laughter, Nadirs is a collection of largely autobiographical stories based on Herta Müller’s childhood in the Romanian countryside. The individual tales reveal a child’s often nightmarish impressions of life in her village. Seamlessly mixing reality with dream-like images, they brilliantly convey the inner, troubled life of a child and at the same time capture the violence and corruption of life under an oppressive state.

Herta Müller, winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature, has been one of the most prolific and acclaimed German-language writers of the last two decades. Born in 1953 in the Banat, a German-language region of Romania, she emigrated to West Berlin in 1987 and currently lives in Berlin.
 
Sieglinde Lug is a professor emerita of German and comparative literature at the University of Denver.

"The world of the village, as Müller celebrates it, rustles on these pages. Each line, each paragraph, such a wedding of insight and the fantastic that I could scarcely hold the book without trembling."—Alan Cheuse, All Things Considered

“A work of striking originality and power.”—Kirkus Reviews

“[Müller] is considered one of the most gifted contemporary German-language writers, a claim this newly translated collection of stories would seem to prove. Once again, Müller takes us back to Communist Romania. But unlike her previous work, Nadirs is a very personal book, as much about Müller’s own family sagas as it is about the inescapable scares of communism. . . . Originally published in German ten years ago, this book was well worth the wait; it is an important achievement in contemporary Eastern European literature.”—Library Journal

“The 15 stories are melodious but sober in tone, echoing an overwhelmingly oppressive social atmosphere. It’s bluntly stated that boys are injured in local factories and mothers’ lives are unrelentingly harsh; meanwhile, Müller imbues a trip to the barber or a ride on the intervillage bus with colorful, surreal twists. . . . Most of these impressionistic pieces are bursting with breathtaking, earthy details.”—Publishers Weekly

“The sudden appearance of words in unfamiliar semantic contexts turns [Müller’s] texts into sensual landscapes of beauty and pain. The translator, Sieglinde Lug, has accomplished this in a highly convincing manner and is able to give the reader a taste of Müller’s unique language.”—Irena E. Fürhoff, International Fiction Review

“[Nadirs features] prose whose power manifests itself in the psychological observations of its author/narrator. . . . Owing gratitude to Lug’s splendid translation, Nadirs is a grave, yet compellingly told series of vignettes which should force readers to look as much within themselves as within the text.”—Brian Budzynski, Review of Contemporary Fiction


Herta Müller is the winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Also of Interest

Hitchhiking
Gabriele Eckart


Daughters of Eve
Nancy Lukens


Round and Other Cold Hard Facts
J.M.G. Le Clezio


Onitsha
J.M.G. Le Clezio