Mysteries of the Jaguar Shamans of the Northwest Amazon

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Mysteries of the Jaguar Shamans of the Northwest Amazon

Robin M. Wright
Foreword by Michael J. Harner

408 pages
18 photographs, 7 illustrations, 2 maps, 2 tables, 2 appendixes

eBook (EPUB)
Ebook purchases delivered via Leaf e-Reader

April 2020

978-1-4962-1122-4

$30.00 Add to Cart
Paperback

November 2016

978-0-8032-9523-0

$30.00 Add to Cart
Hardcover

June 2013

978-0-8032-4394-1

$55.00 Add to Cart
eBook (PDF)
Ebook purchases delivered via Leaf e-Reader

June 2013

978-0-8032-4681-2

$55.00 Add to Cart

About the Book

Mysteries of the Jaguar Shamans of the Northwest Amazon tells the life story of Mandu da Silva, the last living jaguar shaman among the Baniwa people in the northwest Amazon. In this original and engaging work, Robin M. Wright, who has known and worked with da Silva for more than thirty years, weaves the story of da Silva’s life together with the Baniwas’ society, history, mythology, cosmology, and jaguar shaman traditions. The jaguar shamans are key players in what Wright calls “a nexus of religious power and knowledge” in which healers, sorcerers, priestly chanters, and dance-leaders exercise complementary functions that link living specialists with the deities and great spirits of the cosmos. By exploring in depth the apprenticeship of the shaman, Wright shows how jaguar shamans acquire the knowledge and power of the deities in several stages of instruction and practice.

This volume is the first mapping of the sacred geography (“mythscape”) of the Northern Arawak–speaking people of the northwest Amazon, demonstrating direct connections between petroglyphs and other inscriptions and Baniwa sacred narratives as a whole. In eloquent and inviting analytic prose, Wright links biographic and ethnographic elements in elevating anthropological writing to a new standard of theoretically aware storytelling and analytic power.

Author Bio

Robin M. Wright is a professor of religion and an affiliate graduate faculty in the Department of Anthropology and Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida–Gainesville. He is the coeditor of Native Christians: Modes and Effects of Christianity among Indigenous Peoples of the Americas and In Darkness and Secrecy: The Anthropology of Assault Sorcery and Witchcraft in Amazonia.

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