Teaching Western American Literature

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Teaching Western American Literature

Postwestern Horizons Series

348 pages
4 tables

eBook (PDF)

(Requires Adobe Digital Editions)

June 2020

978-1-4962-2129-2

$30.00 Add to Cart
Paperback

June 2020

978-1-4962-2038-7

$30.00 Add to Cart
eBook (EPUB)

(Requires Adobe Digital Editions)

June 2020

978-1-4962-2127-8

$30.00 Add to Cart

About the Book

In this volume experienced and new college- and university-level teachers will find practical, adaptable strategies for designing or updating courses in western American literature and western studies. Teaching Western American Literature features the latest developments in western literary research and cultural studies as well as pedagogical best practices in course development. Contributors provide practical models and suggestions for courses and assignments while presenting concrete strategies for teaching works both inside and outside the canon. In addition, Brady Harrison and Randi Lynn Tanglen have assembled insights from pioneering western studies instructors with workable strategies and practical advice for translating this often complex material for classrooms from freshman writing courses to graduate seminars.

Teaching Western American Literature reflects the cutting edge of western American literary study, featuring diverse approaches allied with women’s, gender, queer, environmental, disability, and Indigenous studies and providing instructors with entrée into classrooms of leading scholars in the field.
 

Author Bio

Brady Harrison is a professor of English at University of Montana. He is the author of The Dying Athabaskan and Agent of Empire: William Walker and the Imperial Self in American Literature. Randi Lynn Tanglen is an associate professor of English and director of the Robert and Joyce Johnson Center for Faculty Development and Excellence in Teaching at Austin College.
 

Praise

“A rich volume. . . . It provides teachers with valuable insight into how classroom teaching is informed by and sometimes advances scholarly conversations about western literature specifically and literary studies more generally, while also providing excellent practical strategies that readers can use to enhance student learning and engagement in their own classrooms.”—Jennifer S. Tuttle, coeditor of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: New Texts, New Contexts

Teaching Western American Literature will appeal to anyone involved in teaching western American literature at the post-secondary level, from the graduate student teaching a course for the first time to the seasoned instructor curious about how their teaching practice fits into the broader landscape or just looking for fresh ideas.”—Victoria Lamont, author of Westerns: A Women’s History

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